Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Psychiatry’ Category

CNN (Park, 12/10) reported, “Since Viagra’s (sildenafil citrate) appearance on the market, the dialogue about sexual dysfunctions has helped doctors identify other health problems in their patients,” physicians say. “Dr. Chris Steidle, a urologist who wrote the book Sex and the Heart,” said that “you always hear someone drops dead.” But, Dr. Steidle added, “It’s not sudden death if you couldn’t get an erection. It’s a symptom of a heart condition.” Furthermore, he said, “You wouldn’t ignore a stroke, but you would ignore erectile dysfunction (ED) — it’s a significant symptom.” Dr. Gerald Melchiode, a Texas psychiatrist, said that “the man’s penis is like…’the canary in the mines,’ which serves as an indicator of overall health.” Dr. Melchiode noted that “there’s now good evidence that shows that men with ED who have no other symptoms of anything are at increased risk for heart attacks and strokes.”

Read Full Post »

In the first article in a short series on self-injury, the Los Angeles Times (12/8, Roan) reports, “Self-inflicted injuries appear to be on the rise, with some young people actually embedding objects in their skin. Stress may be a factor.” But, “even more disturbing than” the “X-rays and accompanying report” presented at a radiology meeting, “could be the size and pervasiveness of the trend from which it derives — self-injury.” Some experts “say that 15…to 22 percent of all adolescents and young adults have intentionally injured themselves at least once in their lifetimes,” and a recent “study of 94 girls, ages 10 to 14, found that 56 percent had hurt themselves at least once.” Research also indicates “the behavior may be building among adults, as well,” because “one study found that one percent of adults self-injure.” Consequently, “at least two committees” working on the new edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual “are addressing self-injury for inclusion in the text.”
        In a separate article, the Los Angeles Times (12/8, Roan) discusses people who may be prone to self-injury. For instance, experts say that “the behavior is more common among people with previous traumatic experience, such as sexual abuse.” Self-injury is also more prevalent “among people with post-traumatic stress disorder, military personnel returning from combat, and people who are incarcerated.” Most self-injurers (70 percent) are female, and the “average age at which self-injury begins is 15.” To date, “at least 18 forms of self-injury have been recorded in medical literature, including cutting, burning, ripping, scratching, rubbing skin with glass or objects, preventing wounds from healing, pulling out hair, breaking bones, putting acid on skin, and mutilating genitals.”
        Therapists hopeful insurers will provide coverage for the disorder. The Los Angeles Times (12/8, Roan) reports, “Even one incident of self-injury should not be ignored by the people who spot it.” Therapists who deal with self-injury “are hopeful that the disorder will receive a name and a definition in the next edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Psychiatric Disorders because, as of now, treatment is not covered by insurance. To receive reimbursement for treatment, many therapists classify the patient as having another disorder, such as depression or borderline personality disorder.”

Read Full Post »

Researchers say AD/HD may hamper teenagers’ efforts to drive.*

UPI (11/6) reports, “Researchers at Tel Aviv University in Israel caution
that attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) may hinder a
teenager’s effort to drive.” They suggest that “youth who fail their
drivers’ tests over and over may be suffering from AD/HD. Even if they
eventually pass these tests, they’re still more likely than others to become
involved in car accidents.” In addition, the researchers “devised a
therapist-supervised approach to retrain AD/HD teens on how to drive.”
Study indicates insomnia in some adults may be linked to neurochemical
abnormalities.
UPI (11/5) reports, “US researchers say they have linked neurochemical
abnormalities to insomnia in young and middle-age adults,” according to a
study published in the journal Sleep. The investigators “used proton
magnetic resonance spectroscopy to non-invasively determine the 16
participants suffering insomnia for more than six months had 30 percent less
of the most common inhibiting transmitter in the brain — gamma-aminobutyric
acid (GABA) — than a well-matched control group.” The authors said that
“GABA decreases overall activity in many brain areas, helping the brain to
‘shut down,’ and point out that having a ‘racing mind’ and an inability to
shut down at night is a common complaint of people with primary insomnia.”

Read Full Post »

Most patients against prescription switching without their knowledge or
physician’s approval, survey indicates.
HealthDay (11/6, Gardner) reported that the users of most prescription
medications “would be unhappy if one of their medications was switched to
another in the same class without their knowledge or their doctor’s
approval,” according to the Consumers’ Views on Therapeutic Substitution
survey. “Prescription switching is the practice of dispensing a different”
medication, “albeit one still in the same class of medications, as the”
medicine “originally prescribed.” For the survey, researchers “contacted
1,387 adults who had filled a prescription in the past year.” They found
that “70 percent of respondents said they would be ‘very’ or ‘extremely’
concerned if their prescription had been switched without their doctor’s
knowledge; 77 percent oppose the practice without doctor or patient
consent.” In addition, “one-third of those who said they or a family member
had experienced therapeutic substitution said the doctor had not been
consulted beforehand, while two-thirds said the family member was not
consulted.”

Read Full Post »

Study suggests children who suffer injuries as infants may have a higher
risk of AD/HD later in life.
The UK’s Press Association (11/7) reports, “Children who develop”
attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) “in later life may have
been more likely to suffer injuries as an infant,” according to a study
published in the BMJ.
Lead author Heather Keenan, M.D., of the University of Utah, and
colleagues, “collected data on 62,088 children who were registered in a
British health improvement network database,” HealthDay (11/6, Reinberg)
added. The authors “compared the children with head injuries to two other
groups: children with a burn/scald injury before the age of two, and all the
other non-injured children.” They “found that children with early head
injury did have a 90 percent higher incidence of AD/HD diagnosis before they
were 10, compared with children in the general population.” But, “children
with a scalding injury also had a higher risk of being diagnosed with AD/HD,
70 percent to be exact.” Based on these findings, the researchers concluded
that “the head injury did not appear to cause the AD/HD.” Dr. Keenan also
suggested that “this finding may mean that some very young children are
already showing behavioral traits that are the hallmarks of AD/HD.” The UK’s
Telegraph (11/7, Devlin) also covers the story.

Read Full Post »

Suffering from the winter doldrums? Research suggests fluctuations in the levels of serotonin transporters may be to blame for SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder).

http://www.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=619182

Read Full Post »

Researchers say patients with schizophrenia may be nearly four times more likely to have a history of middle-ear disease.

http://www.medwire-news.md/47/77422/Psychiatry/Middle-ear_disease_may_be_a_factor_in_schizophrenia_development.html

Read Full Post »

Three additional dosages strengths of Shire’s Adult ADHD drug “Vyvanse” have been introduced in the U.S.

http://www.pharmaceutical-business-review.com/article_news.asp?guid=47DD5436-E104-43E3-88B9-C358294750B0

Read Full Post »

Patients suffering from BiPolar Disorder may want to SNiP this article from the NY Times.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/08/15/science/15visual.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

Read Full Post »

Study says melatonin may help patients over 55 who suffer from insomnia.

http://www.upi.com/Health_News/2008/08/18/Drug_may_help_insomniacs_over_age_55/UPI-88111219095953

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »