Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘ADHD’

According to a study published November 22nd in the New England Journal of Medicine by Paul Lichtenstein, Ph.D et al, “The use of medication to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder [AD/HD] is linked to a lower likelihood of crime,” “Using Swedish national registers, researchers studied about 16,000 men and 10,000 women ages 15 and older who had been diagnosed with AD/HD.” Next, “court and prison records were used to track convictions from 2006 through 2009 and see whether patients were taking AD/HD drugs when their crimes were committed.”  The results showed that as compared with nonmedication periods, among patients receiving ADHD medication, there was a significant reduction of 32% in the criminality rate for men ) and 41% for women.

Read Full Post »

HealthDay (2/2, http://tinyurl.com/lead-ADHD) reported lead may play a role in the development of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).   Genes are believed to account for as much as 70 percent of ADHD in children.  Researchers consider lead a prime suspect, among possible environmental causes, contributing to the other 30 percent .  Lead, a neurotoxin, is present in trace amounts in such things as soil, drinking water, children’s costume jewelry and imported candies.   In one of two recent studies examining the possible link between lead and ADHD, the researchers found that children with ADHD had slightly higher levels of lead in their blood than did children without ADHD.  The second study showed an association between elevated levels of lead in children’s blood and parent/teacher ratings of ADHD symptoms, including both hyperactivity and attention problems.  The findings strongly suggest that lead may be a cause of ADHD, according to Joel Nigg, a psychological scientist at Oregon Health & Science University.  He said that lead might disrupt brain activity in a way that leads to hyperactivity and attention problems. 

Read Full Post »

The UK’s Telegraph (1/25, Devlin http://tinyurl.com/ambi-ADD) reports that ambidextrous children are twice as likely to be hyperactive as their classmates.  They are also twice as likely to suffer from language problems, such as dyslexia.  Scientists believe that differences in how the children’s brains work compared to others could link the problems, but admit they do not yet understand how.  Dr Alina Rodriguez, from Imperial College London, who led the study, said: “Our results should not be taken to mean that all children who are mixed-handed will have problems at school or develop ADHD.  “We found that mixed-handed children and adolescents were at a higher risk of having certain problems, but we’d like to stress that most of the mixed-handed children we followed didn’t have any of these difficulties.”  The study looked at almost 8,000 children, 87 of whom used both hands to write.  The researchers found that by the ages of seven or eight those children were twice as likely as their right-handed peers to have difficulties with language and to perform badly in school.  By the time they reached the age of 15 or 16 the teenagers were also as likely to suffer from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).  Studies suggest that people who write with their right hand have a more dominant left half of their brain.  Some researchers believe that the chances of developing ADHD could be influenced by having a weaker functioning right hemisphere of the brain. 

Read Full Post »

HealthDay (http://tinyurl.com/ADHD-and-Smoking 11/23, Thomas) reported, “Children whose mothers smoked during pregnancy or who were exposed to lead have more than double the risk of having” AD/HD “as other children.” Based on their study of “2,588 children aged eight to 15 from around the” US, scientists from Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center “concluded that about 38 percent of AD/HD cases among children” in that age group “may be caused by prenatal exposure to tobacco smoke, while 25 percent of AD/HD cases are due to lead exposure.”

Read Full Post »

vitaminsMedscape (11/3, Cassels) reported that, according to research, “overall nutritional status in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) shows that this patient population is at risk for low trace mineral status, including deficiencies in zinc and copper.” Canadian found that, “among 44 children aged six to 12 years with AD/HD, rates of zinc and copper deficiency were 45% and 35%, respectively.” In addition, “40% of the children consumed less than the recommended levels of meat and meat alternatives and had low levels of related micronutrients that are essential cofactors for the body’s manufacture of dopamine, norepinephrine, and melatonin.”  Researchers associate low folate levels in pregnancy with increased odds for AD/HD in offspring.  Healthday(11/3, Preidt http://tinyurl.com/low-folate-ADD) reported that, according to a study published online Oct. 28 in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, “low folate levels during pregnancy are associated with higher odds for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) in offspring aged seven to nine.” Investigators also discovered that “children of mothers with low folate levels had notably smaller head circumference at birth, which may indicate a slower rate of prenatal brain growth.”

Read Full Post »

The Washington Post (9/22, Ellison) reports that, according to a study published Sept. 9 in the Journal of the American Medical Association, there may be “a striking difference in the brain’s motivational machinery in people with” attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) symptoms. The study included “a group of healthy subjects” and “53 adults with AD/HD.” Researchers compared “detailed images of participants’ brains with positron emission tomography, or PET, scans after injecting them with a radioactive chemical that binds to dopamine receptors and transporters.” They found that “in people with AD/HD, the receptors and transporters aradhde significantly less abundant in mid-brain structures composing the so-called reward pathway, which is involved in associating stimuli with pleasurable expectations.” Researchers “speculated that people with AD/HD may even have a net deficit of dopamine.”

Read Full Post »

Dopamine HealthDay (9/8, Dotinga) reported that, according to a study published Sept. 9 in the Journal of the American Medical Association, the “the trouble concentrating that affects people with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) might be related to motivation.” Specifically, “the motivational problems seen with” AD/HD “appear to stem from a reduction in” the neurotransmitter dopamine. For the study, researchers from the US National Institute on Drug Abuse and the Brookhaven National Laboratory recruited “53 adults with AD/HD” who “underwent positron emission tomography (PET) scans for dopamine markers.” Next, the team “compared the results with PET scans of 44 adults without the condition.” In participants with AD/HD, the investigators found “disruptions in the two dopamine pathways associated with reward and motivation.”   WebMD (9/8, Warner) pointed out that “the results offer new insight into AD/HD, as well as help explain why people with AD/HD may be more likely to abuse drugs or become obese.” Lead study author Nora D. Volkow, MD, stated, “Our results also support the continued use of stimulant medications — the most common pharmacological treatment for AD/HD — which have been shown to increase attention to cognitive tasks by elevating brain dopamine.”   CBC News (9/9), BBC News (9/8), the UK’s Daily Mail (9/9, Hope), and the UK’s Telegraph (9/8, Smith) also covered the story.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »