Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘bipolar’

bdnfMedWire (9/15, Davenport) reports that, according to a study published in the journal Bipolar Disorders, “euthymic bipolar disorder patients have similar serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels to those of healthy individuals, supporting the theory that treatment normalizes levels of the neurotrophin.” For the study, researchers from Brazil’s Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre “used an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure serum BDNF levels in 65 euthymic patients with bipolar I disorder and 50 healthy controls.” The team also “administered a neurocognitive battery to assess attention and mental control, perceptual-motor skills, executive function, verbal fluency, verbal abstraction, visuospatial attention, and memory function.” The investigators discovered “no significant differences in serum BDNF levels between patients and controls.”

Read Full Post »

MedWire (8/27, Davenport) reports that, according to a study published online Aug. 10 in the journal Bipolar Disorders, “the gating ratio of auditory brain potentials at 85 ms (P85) may help clinicians differentiate between bipolar disorder patients and healthy individuals.” For the study, researchers from tbp-buckeyepsychiatryhe University of California-Irvine “measured…P85 auditory evoked potentials in 45 patients with schizoaffective disorder, 66 patients with paranoid schizophrenia, 42 bipolar I disorder patients, and 56 healthy controls.” The team found “significant differences in the average P85 gating ratio between the groups, at 124.8 for bipolar I disorder patients, 96.0 for schizoaffective disorder patients, 84.7 for patients with paranoid schizophrenia, and 70.5 for healthy controls.” The authors suggested that “the previously unstudied P85 component may represent a new biological marker for bipolar disorder.”

Read Full Post »

MedWire(4/21, Cowen) reported that, according to a study to be published in the journal Disease Models & Mechanisms, researchers from the UK’s Cardiff University “have identified a possible mechanism for how lithium stabilizes the mood of people with bipolar disorder.” In performing “laboratory tests on cells,” the team “found that lithium affects a molecule called phosphatidyl inositol triphosphate (PIP3),” which is “important for controlling brain cell signaling. Specifically, lithium inhibits an enzyme called inositol monophosphatase (IMPase) that is required for making a simple sugar called inositol, from which PIP3 is made.” Notably, “increasing the amount of IMPase causes higher levels of PIP3, which can be reduced with lithium treatment.” Previously, research has linked the IMPA2 gene, “a variant of IMPase, to bipolar disorder.” The present study “suggests that lithium could counteract the changes in IMPA2.”

Read Full Post »

The AP (3/17) reported that Cephalon announced Tuesday “that patients taking Nuvigil (armodafinil) along with mood stabilizers in an eight-week midstage study showed improvement in depression symptoms. The drug, which is already approved to treat narcolepsy, was also well-tolerated by patients.” In the study, side effects “included mania, hypomania, depression, and suicidal thoughts, but were comparable with patients taking placebo. Restlessness and anxiety were also side effects experienced by the Nuvigil group.” Now, Cephalon “plans on moving the drug along to late-stage trials, which are larger in scale, to further test the drug’s effectiveness in treating bipolar disorder.”

Read Full Post »

Research suggests patients with bipolar disorder should self-monitor sleep duration to predict mood change.
MedWire (1/6, Davenport) reports that, according to a study published in the Journal of Affective Disorders, patients with bipolar disorder “should self-monitor their sleep duration in order to predict mood change.” For the study, researchers from Germany’s Technische Universit├Ąt Dresden “examined data on mood, sleep, and medications recorded every day by 101 adult bipolar disorder outpatients on a home computer for an average of 265 days. All patients received treatment as usual.” For each patient, “the team calculated a daily time series of mood, sleep duration, sleep onset, and sleep offset.” The investigators observed “a significant cross-correlation between sleep duration and mood…in 42 percent of the patients.” Therefore, the authors recommended that “patients with bipolar disorder be taught to monitor sleep duration for an oncoming mood change, rather than sleep onset or sleep offset.”

Read Full Post »