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Posts Tagged ‘mild cognitive impairment’

HealthDay (3/22, Preidt, http://tinyurl.com/MCI-Alzheimer) reported that “memory and thinking skills can deteriorate quickly in people with mild cognitive impairment, the stage before Alzheimer’s disease.”  The study involved 1,158 people, who averaged 79 years old. The group included 149 people with Alzheimer’s disease, 395 with mild cognitive impairment and 614 with no thinking or memory problems.  The scores of people with mild cognitive impairment declined twice as fast each year as did scores of those with no memory problems. The scores for people with Alzheimer’s declined four times as fast as those of participants with no cognitive problems.  The results are in the March 23 issue of Neurology.  “The changes in rate of decline occur as the brain atrophies due to the disease, first mainly in the hippocampus during the initial symptomatic stage, referred to as mild cognitive impairment, then in the temporal, parietal and frontal cortex during the dementing illness phase of Alzheimer’s disease,” said Dr. David S. Knopman, of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who wrote an editorial accompanying the study.

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According to a December article in the Journal of the American Medical Association  (JAMA. 2009;302(24):2663-2670. http://tinyurl.com/ginko-dementiaGinkgo Biloba did not slow the rates of global or domain-specific cognitive decline in older adults.  The herbal product Ginkgo Biloba is taken frequently with the intention of improving cognitive health in aging.  However, evidence from adequately powered clinical trials is lacking regarding its effect on long-term cognitive functioning.   The Ginkgo Evaluation of Memory (GEM) study, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of 3069 community-dwelling participants aged 72 to 96 years, was conducted in 6 academic medical centers in the United States between 2000 and 2008.  Twice-daily dose of 120-mg extract of G biloba or identical-appearing placebo were given.  Rates of change over time in the Modified Mini-Mental State Examination and in neuropsychological domains of memory, attention, visual-spatial construction, language, and executive functions were evaluated .  Annual rates of decline in the scores did not differ between G biloba and placebo groups in any domains, including memory, attention, visuospatial abilities, language and executive functions.  Compared with placebo, the use of G biloba, 120 mg twice daily, did not result in less cognitive decline in older adults with normal cognition or with mild cognitive impairment.

 

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mcFollowing a HealthDay story, Medscape (7/27, Gandey) reported that, according to a study published in the July 22/29 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, “several cerebrospinal-fluid biomarkers have shown accuracy in identifying patients with mild cognitive impairment who went on to develop Alzheimer’s disease (AD).” For the study, researchers from Sweden’s Sahlgrenska University “identified biomarker cutoff levels in patients with AD and controls,” then “evaluated patients with cognitive impairment from 12 centers in the United States and Europe.” In their study of “750 patients with mild cognitive impairment , 529 with AD, and 304 controls,” the team “followed patients with mild cognitive impairment for at least two years or until symptoms had progressed to clinical dementia.” The investigators found that “patients who developed AD had lower median levels of Aß42, higher levels of tau phosphorylated at position threonine, and higher total tau protein levels than patients who did not develop AD.” An accompanying editorial suggested that the study represented “a major step forward.”

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