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Posts Tagged ‘omega-3 and depression’

Medscape (6/24, Brauser, http://tinyurl.com/omega3-depression) reported Omega-3 fatty acid supplements significantly reduce symptoms of major depressive episodes (MDEs) for patients without comorbid anxiety disorders (ADs) compared with those taking placebo, according to a new study of more than 400 patients from 8 Canadian clinics.  Despite the availability of several newer antidepressants over the last 20 years, a substantial proportion of patients experiencing a depressive episode do not respond sufficiently to antidepressant treatment, are unable to tolerate antidepressants in order to obtain or maintain a clinical response, or refuse to take antidepressants despite substantial psychological suffering and disability notes the study author Dr. Lespérance.  Almost 54% of people with depression in the United States use some form of complementary treatment. In addition, the omega-3 supplements “seemed to be more efficacious for patients as a stand-alone treatment in comparison to adjuvant treatment,” reported Dr. Lespérance.

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o3HealthDay (6/18, West) reported that, according to research published online in the Journal of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, there may be a “relationship between low levels of omega-3 fatty acids and an increased risk of depression in heart patients.” For the study, researchers from the University of California-San Francisco “looked at 987 adults with coronary heart disease. Among those with the lowest levels of omega-3 fatty acids, 23 percent suffered from depression,” with “each unit decrease or increase in omega-3” being “reflected in a corresponding rise or lowering of depressive symptoms.” Among those patients “with the highest levels of the fatty acid in their blood,” however, “only 13 percent were diagnosed with depressive symptoms.” HealthDay noted that “the types of omega-3 measured in the study were docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid.”

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