Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘TRD’

a_06_cr_mou_1aHealthDay (5/7, Gardner) reported that, according to a study presented at a neurology meeting, “cortical brain stimulation improved symptoms and, in some cases, launched a full remission for people with major depression who had suffered for decades and who had failed multiple other treatments.” For the study, researchers from the Massachusetts General Hospital randomly assigned “a dozen patients with refractory depression…to receive eight weeks of cortical stimulation of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) area of the brain, which appears to play a role in depression, or to get ‘sham’ stimulation.” Next, “those receiving the sham treatment were then switched over to active therapy.” The team found that, “on average, participants experienced an improvement of about 25 percent to 30 percent on different measures of both depression and quality of life,” and “three people went into complete remission.”

Read Full Post »

Research suggests treatment-resistant depression may be associated with reduced global cortical folding surface.  MedWire (3/20, Davenport) reported that, according to a study published in the March issue of the Journal of Psychiatry and Neuroscience, “in unipolar and bipolar patients, treatment-resistant depression is associated with reduced global cortical folding surface.” For the study, researchers from France’s Hôpital Cochin in Paris “studied 16 bipolar disorder patients currently in a treatment-resistant major depressive episode, 25 euthymic bipolar disorder patients, 35 patients with treatment-resistant unipolar depression, and 70 healthy controls.” Using “T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI),” the team found that patients with bipolar disorder “with treatment-resistant depression had significantly smaller” hemispheric global sulcal indices (g-SIs) “in the right hemisphere than controls.” Among patients with “treatment-resistant unipolar depression…s-GIs were three to four percent lower in both hemispheres than the corresponding values in controls.” The authors concluded that “reduced cortical folding surface appeared to be a feature of both unipolar depression and bipolar disorder with treatment-resistant depression.”

Read Full Post »