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Posts Tagged ‘Violence’

That_Makes_Me_AngryCNN (5/26, Landau) reported that “psychiatrists do have some sense of why some people ‘snap’ and become violent.” While, for some, “a person’s snap into violence may come as a total surprise, in most cases there is a psychological buildup to that point,” explained psychiatrist Peter Ash, MD, of Emory University. Dr. Ash pointed out that the “pathway to violence…starts with some thinking and then fantasizing about a plan.” Then, “the fantasy of killing others may turn into intention, leading the person to track victims and obtain weapons,” Dr. Ash added. According to forensic psychiatrist Lyle Rossiter, MD, “the psychological buildup to a violent outburst with the intent to kill usually takes a minimum of a few days.” Other “clear risk factors to snapping, psychiatrists say…include brain tumors, seizures, alcohol and drug abuse, and psychosis stemming from schizophrenia or other disorders.” Brain injuries may also increase “the risk of violent and aggressive behavior,” as do “feelings of being hopeless, ashamed, and trapped,” said psychiatrist Charles Raison, MD, also of Emory University.

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The CBS Evening News (4/7, story 5, 4:55, Couric) reported, “In a new book,” No Right to Remain Silent, “a former Virginia Tech professor,” Lucinda Roy, “writes that she tried to get” 23-year-old gunman Seung-Hui Cho “help before it was too late, but no one would listen.” During “the fall of 2005…a colleague had alerted her to Cho’s disturbing writings and disruptive behavior. In her book,” Roy explains that she decided “to tutor him privately,” and “found a student…who was almost always unresponsive.” To get Cho some help, Roy “contacted four different departments on campus, including the counseling center and university police.” She was told that “requiring a student to seek counseling” was “against Virginia Tech policy…unless it’s an emergency,” which “administrators…did not indicate it was.” And, “because Cho was over 21 at the time, his parents were never notified about his problems.” Later, “a special state panel convened after the” April 2007 “shootings concluded the school had misinterpreted privacy laws.” Since the shootings, “Virginia Tech has” added “additional counselors” and established “a risk assessment team to handle troubled students.”

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AP reports that “leading disease specialists say there’s no convincing evidence linking” Lyme disease to “violent behavior.” Dr. Eugene Shapiro, a Lyme disease specialist at Yale University, said that while there are isolated reports of hallucinations and psychotic illness blamed on Lyme disease, these are controversial.” Dr. Shapiro noted that “these cases likely involve people with pre-existing mental problems or who were misdiagnosed and never had Lyme disease.” Dr. Paul Auwaerter, an infectious disease specialist at Johns Hopkins medical school, added that “mental illness is much more common than Lyme disease, and it would be ‘extraordinarily rare’ to develop a true psychosis from the disease.” Nonetheless, “some patient-advocacy groups use the term ‘Lyme rage’ to explain aggressive psychiatric symptoms.”
        FOX News (3/9, Pouliot) reported, “According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Lyme disease is caused by the bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, which normally lives in mice, squirrels, deer and other small animals. It is transmitted among these animals — and to humans — through the bites of certain species of ticks.” The Sydney Morning Herald (3/10) also covers the story.

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